Motivational Monday: Let Nothing Stop You From Your Goals

It’s the first Monday of the new year, the perfect time to start implementing our health goals that we’ve set for ourselves.

Don’t give up if you don’t get it right at first. Keep trying and stay consistent.

Nothing can stop you from meeting your health goals!

📝 What health goals are you working on this week (emotional, physical, or mental)?

📝 What will you do to keep yourself accountable?

Until Next Time,

The Genetic Diabetic

Remembering Grandma

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It has been exactly 20 years today since my grandmother passed away. My grandmother was a fierce, intelligent woman who held our family together.

I was a teenager when my grandma’s health declined. She had congestive heart failure, diabetes, and was legally blind. As a teen, I did not understand the extent of her health problems nor how they related.

Now that I’m living with the same diabetes diagnosis, I understand what my grandma was going through, how diabetes and heart disease are linked and how those issues can potentially limit your life.

It’s my mission to share what I’ve learned with people with diabetes and their loved ones. There is a family history of diabetes on both sides, and I just want to do my part in changing the narrative.

On this day of remembrance, I want to encourage you to keep your health in check: learn more about your condition, maintain a healthy diabetes management routine, and if you need help, don’t be afraid to ask. Don’t let diabetes limit your life.

Until Next Time,

The Genetic Diabetic

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Motivational Monday

Every member of this community is here because they or someone they know is battling diabetes.
Diabetes is a life-long condition that takes work for us to manage. What may work for us one day might not work the next. So many factors contribute to our numbers fluctuating. There’s always a chance that the condition will progress even if you do everything you can.

However, we still have three options for how to approach the way we handle this:

– Giving up and don’t do anything about this condition

– Giving in and doing the least we can to treat this condition

OR

– Giving our best and not only control our condition, but do our best to learn about diabetes and to try and discover ways to stop its progression by doing our best. Additionally, even when treatment fails, you don’t give up or give in.

This week’s Motivational Monday’s Message:

Don’t give up.

Don’t give in.

⭐️Give it all you’ve got⭐️

Until Next Time,

The Genetic Diabetic

Sound Off: Diabetes and Exercise

People with diabetes can benefit greatly from daily exercise.   

These are just a few benefits:  

  • Maintains a healthy body weight
  • Reduces the risk of heart disease
  • Improves blood glucose management and blood flow
  • Improves mood overall
  • Boosts sleep quality
  • Improves your ability to cope with depression, anxiety, and stress

To ensure you are exercising safely, speak with your doctor before starting any new exercise routine so they can help you choose appropriate activities and set blood glucose targets.   

Sound Off: How do you exercise? Do you have a routine that works for you? Do you face any obstacles to exercising? Comment below to share your experience.  

Until Next Time,

The Genetic Diabetic

Live Life Today!

It’s easy for us to be concerned about the future with chronic illness. However, we must keep in mind that there is so much life left in us. It may not be the ideal life that we’ve imagined, but it is still life. So instead of worrying about the how our conditions might affect us in the future, let’s just focus on today. Do what you can today.

Live life just one day at a time ❤️

Until Next Time,

The Genetic Diabetic

Chronic Illness Tales: Allison’s Story

Read how Allison is taking charge of her health and not allowing anything to stop her.

Allison
Age: 45
Conditions: Hypothyroidism and allergies to everything outside (biweekly shots) and dust mites and mold.

Year diagnosed? 15 or so years ago for hypothyroidism and maybe 5 years ago I was tested for allergies.

How were you diagnosed?
Tested by blood tests for hypothyroidism after demanding bloodwork (doctors said I was fine, I work too hard, maybe I was depressed…I knew something else was wrong but couldn’t figure out what). After bloodwork they were almost surprised, like oh, something IS wrong. This was probably the hardest part and the part that took the longest. It’s hard getting passed doctors who look at you and say you’re fine and disregard what you’re trying to tell them.
With allergies, same thing, I had to keep trying to figure out root causes of why I struggled. Life shouldn’t feel so hard. Allergies are one of those things too that doctors can’t see, but the patient feels and knows something isn’t right.

How have the chronic conditions affected your life? I think the mental torment is the worst part. I tried for so long to fix things on my own or worse, thought I wasn’t doing something right. I cried a lot. Conditions like these often go unnoticed or undiagnosed but the symptoms are terrible to live with. I take medicine for hypothyroidism. I have no idea if I could feel better, I don’t know any different. I still want to find a better doctor. Currently where I go the doctor turnover is so high it’s like I have a new primary doctor every year and half to two years. It’s frustrating and honestly, I haven’t put in energy to find a different doctor (I would have to travel more than I already do for doctors and I’ve become complacent. Typing this is convicting me to not be. 😳😶

Your thyroid plays a HUGE role in your overall well-being. I had no idea and still could learn more. Again, just typing this is convicting me to start researching it more and find a doctor who specializes in it. I’ve heard so many say they can get off medications with proper diet. I asked a thyroid specialist and he said, NO! Food doesn’t change anything. I don’t know why I stopped checking. I assumed since he was the specialist on thyroid disorders, he would know. I know I don’t live in area where there are many specialists. I had to drive over 100 miles just to see him (which is probably why I stopped checking. 😔).

How have you grown since diagnosis a d what do you wish people knew about the condition and/or chronic illnesses in general? I will say that learning about what I COULD do enabled me to actually feel like I’m living. I hear so many women give up like it’s a life sentence to be turned an overweight for the rest if their lives. I’m living proof you can be fit and healthy with hypothyroidism. I have to work for it and eat healthy, but it’s possible. 😁💪🏻❤

I hope that Allison’s story resonated with you. Learning more about your condition and researching ways to control the symptoms is the first step in owning your health journey.

You have the power to take charge of your health. Don’t let your illness control you!

We want to hear your story!

If you would like to be included, email me at thegeneticdiabeticblog@gmail.com by July 18th with the following information:

First name
Age (Optional)
Condition
Year diagnosed
How you were diagnosed?
How has your condition affected your life?
How have you grown since your diagnosis?
What do you wish people knew about your condition or chronic illness in general?
Picture of yourself or family (optional)

Your story has the ability to educate, empower and motivate others who might be struggling on their own journey. Telling your story can be freeing and therapeutic, not only for the listener but also for yourself. The more you share your story, you will gain a better understanding of yourself and it will also help build greater self-confidence.

Telling your story has the capacity to change lives, including your own.

Until Next Time,

The Genetic Diabetic

The Need for Chronic Disease Awareness

We all know at least one person with a chronic condition.

Why do we have a Chronic Disease Awareness month?

Don’t we already observe awareness months for certain illnesses already?

Yes, it’s true that we do observe some months for individual illnesses; however, chronic conditions have been increasing exponentially in all Americans for several years.

Chronic illness is defined as health conditions that last one year or more and requires ongoing medical attention and/or limit activities of daily living.

Currently, there are a total of 20 chronic conditions. The 10 chronic conditions that are considered as chronic illnesses include:

– Arthritis

– Cancer (Breast, colorectal, lung and prostate)

– Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

– Coronary heart disease (Coronary artery disease)

– Asthma

– Diabetes

– Hepatitis ( Viral B & C)

– Hypertension (High blood pressure)

– Stroke

– Kidney disease

Unfortunately, chronic conditions account for 7 of the top 10 leading causes of death in the United States.

According to a 2018 peer-reviewed research study from Preventing Chronic Disease, 129 million adult Americans (51.8 %) had a chronic condition. Sixty-one million (24.6%) adults had one chronic condition.

Sixty-eight million adults (27.2 %) had two chronic or more conditions. The chances of being diagnosed with two or more chronic conditions were higher among women, non-Hispanic white adults, older adults, adults aged 18–64 on Medicaid, dual-eligible adults (Medicare and Medicaid), and adults in rural areas.

More likely, we know a family member, friend or coworker battling a chronic condition. Many who are diagnosed with chronic illnesses suffer from lack of attention, proper medical care and resources.

This is the reason why organizations like the Chronic Disease Coalition and Good Days are dedicating this month to raise awareness of the impact of chronic disease in this country and to encourage others to advocate for access to quality care, treatment and resources for those with chronic illnesses.

The Chronic Disease Coalition, where I serve as an ambassador, has always advocated and raised awareness on behalf of the chronic illness community. Therefore, every month is Chronic Disease Awareness! However, in July, we specifically amplify patient voices while continuing to advocate for patient rights. The organization has planned amazing opportunities to get people engaged in advocacy efforts, including access to their special Chronic Disease month toolkit, live interviews and a Chronic University event about policy advocacy.

The Good Days Organization has dedicated July 10th as Chronic Disease Awareness Day. There are opportunities for people to participate in social media campaigning, a healthy recipe contest, opportunities for your hometown to recognize Chronic Disease Day and a separate live-stream event on July 13th.

Chronic illness rates are steadily increasing, but remember, we have the power to change the narrative. Consider taking part in the movements mentioned or consider starting your own local effort. This chronic illness journey is not meant for us to fight alone. There is strength in unity.

Until Next Time,

The Genetic Diabetic

The Chronic Disease Coalition: https://chronicdiseasecoalition.org/news/july-is-chronic-disease-month

Good Day’s Chronic Disease Day: https://chronicdiseaseday.org/

References:

Boersma P, Black LI, Ward BW. Prevalence of Multiple Chronic Conditions Among US Adults, 2018. Prev Chronic Dis 2020;17:200130. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5888/pcd17.200130

Chronic Conditions: https://www.cms.gov/Research-Statistics-Data-and-Systems/Statistics-Trends-and-Reports/Chronic-Conditions/CC_Main

Sound Off- What’s Your Chronic Illness Story?

Everyone has a story to tell.

Chronic Illness Month starts next week and as an ambassador of the Chronic Disease Coalition (CDC), I will help raise awareness of the various issues that chronic illness warriors face on a daily basis. In addition to shedding light on these issues, I will also like to use this opportunity to share your chronic illness story in hopes that others would be inspired to take charge of their own health, no matter how difficult it can be.

My plan is to highlight 1-2 stories a week for the entire month of July. If you would like to be included, email me at thegeneticdiabeticblog@gmail.com by July 18th with the following information:

  • First name
  • Age (Optional)
  • Condition
  • Year diagnosed
  • How you were diagnosed?
  • How has your condition affected your life?
  • How have you grown since your diagnosis?
  • What do you wish people knew about your condition or chronic illness in general?
  • Picture of yourself or family (optional)

Your story has the ability to educate, empower and motivate others who might be struggling on their own journey. Telling your story can be freeing and therapeutic, not only for the listener but also for yourself. The more you share your story, you will gain a better understanding of yourself and it will also help build greater self-confidence.

Telling your story has the capacity to change lives, including your own.